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Another successful show at Holz-Handwerk

 


The completely redesigned Altendorf F 45 unveiled in 2015 will appeared at the Holz-Handwerk trade fair for the first time this year. Visitors saw what amounted in technical terms to a new beast entirely: from the machine frame to the motors to the control units, all key components have been updated to the latest state of the art. The old model names have also fallen by the wayside as Altendorf moves to a new product policy based much more around modularity and versatility in configuration. Now all configurations go by the same name: F 45.

Altendorf F 45 garners another iF Product Design Award.


Altendorf continues to hit the right notes in design too: the new F 45 received the iF Label in the product design category in this year's edition of the iF DESIGN AWARD. The jury of international experts praised the way it combines functionality with modern materials, design and use of colour in particular and identified the modular nature of the configuration options as epitomising modern pragmatism.

The latest achievement means that Altendorf has now won this prestigious design award eight times, underlining the company's special position in the woodworking industry. One of the most sought-after international accolades for professional product designers, the globally renowned iF DESIGN AWARD is presented annually. The 2016 edition attracted 5,295 submissions from 2,458 contestants in 53 countries.

CEHISA - Guarantee of a great company



CEHSIA might sound like a new name to some, with Altendorf Asia Pacific only recently representing their range of edgebanders in 2013, the name in reality dates a long way back. In fact, the company was founded in Spain in 1956 and is dedicated to manufacturing machinery solely for wood processing purposes.

Over the years CEHISA quickly became one of the most prominent woodworking machinery manufacturers in Europe and is notably known for their line-up of edgebanding solutions. A global forerunner in this field, CEHSIA’s edgebanders, ranging from small, medium size machines, to full systems have been produced since 1968.

CEHISA machines are easy to use and are equipped with precise, reliable, robust hi-tech features with various machining speeds and finishing techniques. They’re capable of working with a wide range of materials. The company’s research and design team is constantly developing and applying their latest technological innovations in order to deliver the competitive edge. Always up for a challenge, the team often takes on some of the most demanding tasks and at times have even provided personalised solutions adapted to the individual needs of customers.

After achieving immense popularity at the 1975 Ligna industry exhibition with the presentation of a new concept edgebander, CEHISA entered the international market including Australia. While the company has been operating around five continents and in more than 58 countries, it is not until recently that the company’s class leading portfolio of edgabanders are represented in Australia by one of the oldest names in the industry – Altendorf. This signifies a new chapter for the company in terms of their presence in Australia. Businesses adopting the machines can expect the same quality of servicing and post purchase support Altendorf panel saw owners enjoy. Please call Altendorf Asia Pacific on 1800 558 258 for more information on the CEHISA edgebander range.

A modern innovation from the past



Cyclical patterns of invention and development have been observed since the days of ancient civilisations, the same certainly applies to one of the more modern innovations in the wood working industry. Cross Laminated Timber is a popular style of housing construction which utilises bonded timber boards as the main building material of houses. While it has only been in the last 20 years that this method of construction has spread across the continents, predating this trend by almost 70 years, Wilhelm Altendorf developed one of the first pre-fabricated systems of building.

Most refer to him as the father of the modern panel saw; Wilhelm Altendorf’s name is a familiar one among the wood working industry. After acquiring a suitable plot of land in Bismarckstraße, Wilhelm Altendorf started to design his own building. Since wood was his profession and his preferred building material, it seemed reasonable to utilise this preference for this own house.

An entirely new style of solid wooden-frame construction was developed. Its brilliant simplicity was a remarkable feat of engineering and could be erected quickly without specialised knowledge. Furthermore, this was all accomplished at an unbeatable price of 3,400 Reichsmarks at the time, equivalent to $9,000 today!

His new home was constructed in a relatively short period of time and the unusual manner of building did not go unnoticed. The swiftness with which the building could be erected by a non-skilled worker on the basis of a vertical self-supporting wooden frame was most impressive. Wilhelm patented the innovative method of construction in 1920.  Many well-known architects of the post-war period were interested in the mode of construction and prefabricated houses became the trend.

While Altendorf’s system gained popularity, Wilhelm’s natural passion of wood processing technology lead him to further concentrate his efforts in his existing sliding table saw system, it was an even greater success. 
Wilhelm’s solid-wooden frame construction was only one of his many projects - from machinery to automobiles.  Yet the Altendorf construction system was one of the first ever prefabricated house concepts.

A truly amazing saw


Within a year of founding his company, Wilhelm Altendorf achieved a dramatic breakthrough. He invented the first sliding table and cicular saw, based on the “altendorf system” – having no idea that, at a future date, it would become a top product with an international reputation.

Altendorf’s saw set a new standard in woodworking. For the differences from traditional machines were considerable. Up to that time, a conventional table saw had no mechanism for edging. That meant that, for the first and second longitudinal cut on untreated massive wood, the lumber always had to be fed manually through the saw blade.


The new Altendorf system of a sliding table and circular saw accomplished this task much more elegantly. With this system, the wood to be cut was fed through the saw blade while lying on a sliding table. By means of this innovative principle, cutting precision was vastly improved. (At a later date, the sliding table principle was replaced by the double roller carriage, also invented by Wilhelm Altendorf.) Wheras, previously, irregularities on the cutting surfaces had to be eliminated by additional truing up, now both the longitudinal cuts and the crosscuts came out of the machine absolutely even. This meant that by utilising a sliding table and circular saw the joiner or cabinetmaker could achieve a perfect, finished cut in one operation, in addition to eliminating the need for time-consuming finishing touches. It should be added that all sliding table saws built today are based on the prototype of the Altendorf system.

The decision in times of scant means to design and build his own machines from then on was typical of Wilhelm Altendorf. Whenever things got difficult, he began to fight and search for practicable solutions. He viewed financial difficulties as opportunities for venturing forth on new paths. And as a DIY enthusiast, he also took a great deal of pleasure in mastering challenges.

 

1906, a new company is born.


Within a short period of time, Wilhelm Altendorf had furthered his career in Berlin. In his first professional position, he had been promoted to head draftsman, and he was in charge of a five-member team of furniture designers. But this advance did not satisfy Wilhelm Altendorf for long. He wanted more. Little by little his plans took shape: Wilhelm Altendorf wanted to turn his ideas into reality in his own company.

The prospects for success were quite promising. In the course of his job as a salaried draftsman, Altendorf had already acquired sufficient know-how to risk the leap into self-employment. What was more, shortly after the turn of the century there were only three firms in all of Berlin that specialized in the construction of stores. On the other hand, more and more new companies and stores were moving into the capital, which led to a skyrocketing demand for good store-building concepts. After working for two years, and when all Berlin was laughing at the play “Der Hauptmann von Koepenick”, the time had come. In January 1906, Wilhelm Altendorf, together with his brother-in-law, Ernst Mueller, founded his own factory for store fittings near the Hackescher Markt at the address Grosse Hamburgerstrasse 20.

Altendorf’s wife, Emma Altendorf, assisted her husband to the best of her ability. During the day, she ran her own cigar store, as well as managing twenty rental apartments which were all located in the same building as the new store construction company. Evening after evening she did the bookkeeping for the young company on her Mignon typewriter – a task that she continued to do for many years. She was reluctant to entrust this important job even to a trained accountant, for she only really trusted her own arithmetic skills. At times, this resulted in double bookkeeping, whereby her version – if an error managed to slip in –was, of course, always the correct one.

It was only a year later that Altendorf ’s partner, Ernst Mueller, left the company – which left Wilhelm Altendorf facing a considerable challenge. His financial means were severely limited, allowing him scant leeway for urgently needed investments in machinery. But even if he had been in the financial position, Altendorf wanted nothing to do with the available technology, for the simple reason that the woodworking machines then available on the market failed to satisfy his requirements. In this ticklish situation, he summoned up his creative abilities and began himself to develop and construct machines for his own use. The particularly unusual thing about this was that most of these machines were made of wood and not of iron, which was the standard material.

The decision in times of scant means to design and build his own machines from then on was typical of Wilhelm Altendorf. Whenever things got difficult, he began to fight and search for practicable solutions. He viewed financial difficulties as opportunities for venturing forth on new paths. And as a DIY enthusiast, he also took a great deal of pleasure in mastering challenges.

The pursuit for Productivity and Quality.


Classic Cabinet software explores the best of both worlds…


For most business owners, seeing increased output for the same amount of input is one of the key measures of ongoing success. There has been a huge push in recent years to change the way we manufacture. Advanced CNC machinery promised to revolutionise the manufacturing process and deliver better profits as a result. However, the one size fits all philosophy does not

always work well when it comes to business and not everyone reaped the benefit of such investment. Many small to medium size manufacturers have built their success on tried and true practices only to be overwhelmed by the total change in manufacturing philosophy. There are significant investments both in terms of cost and time involved in the transition to new manufacturing processes and many have underestimated the commitment needed to make it successful. On the other hand, alternative solutions to maximise productivity on traditional manufacturing methods do exist. Altendorf’s Optimisation 2 and Classic Cabinets are examples of such combinations that can deliver high quality manufacturing on the trusted and proven panel saw platform.

Optimisation 2 is a newly introduced optimisation package bundled with Altendorf’s Elmo range of panel saws, answering the needs of many in search of a simple yet powerful panel sizing software to augment the saw. For Port Stephens based GJ Morgan Kitchens, the panel saw is the foundation on which their high precision work and stylish designs are built, and the Optimisation 2 couldn’t have come sooner. “…Because our kitchens are unique each time, the saw is something we really invest in and try to maximise in order to be competitive. Our new saw being fully automated really speeds up the workflow and when combined with Optimisation 2, it’s even faster,” explains Michelle, owner of GJ Morgan Kitchens. With their new saw and optimisation package, the business has been able to cut down a significant amount of time previously required for calculations, edging and other manual processes. “The software minimises the likelihood of human errors and there’s not much learning or extra effort involved,” says Michelle, “to us, it simply means we can deliver more at the premium level of quality our customers have come to expect from us.”

Building upon the technologies most modern joiners have come to trust, Classic Cabinet software takes saw based manufacturing even further. “Over the years I’ve developed quite an effective system comprising of a CAD, Spread Sheet and Optimisation program,” says Ivo of I & S Joinery, an industry veteran who’s business is renowned for their attention to detail, “then I saw Classic Cabinets, it took streamlining to the next level. It was intuitive and as we build up our libraries, the time savings keeps on increasing.”

While I & S Joinery’s forte is in the field of detailed and intricate joinery work, Ivo sees potential in his business to leap forward and take on high volume repetitious projects. After just a few months, the collective impact of Ivo’s Elmo 4 and design software has already meant Ivo has no problem keeping his seven cabinetmakers busy with a steady flow of components. “It used to take a full day to work out preproduction preparations such as drawing, panel calculation and so on. Now we’re talking about getting that done in about an hour.” Explains Ivo, “I’m pretty involved in all my work and enjoy working on intricate projects, but now thanks to the productivity increase with our new saw and software package, we’re looking to take on mass production contracts while retaining the standard of quality we are now providing.”

Software and machine integration has become the corner stone of productivity and efficiency in the modern woodworking industry. Combining software with the panel saw, the backbone of every joinery shop, represents one of the most effective ways to step up turn over with less risk and compromise, be it quality of work or future expandability.

Unique Cabinet Makers


A reputation for quality


Thirteen years ago, Gus Lobuono started his new business Unique Cabinet Makers in the small industrial suburb of Kilkenny. From the onset of his business Gus held great emphasis for the quality and precision of his work. With that beginning Gus invested in an Altendorf F90 machine.

While the F90 was one of Altendorf’s most basic machines of its sliding table panel saw line up, this panel saw was a robust platform which laid grounds for quality manufacturing with minimal down time.

Catering for a wide variety of clients ranging from kitchen renovations to commercial installations and shop fittings, Gus garnered a solid reputation within the community and quickly saw the need to expand his business.

When it came to the choice of a new machine with more productivity features to streamline his workflow, it was nothing but an Altendorf for Gus, “even the old machine was perfect and never missed a beat.” This time it was an Altendorf Elmo 3 VP C.A.T.S, a higher end modern variant of his existing machine. A true workhorse, the Elmo 3 combines the latest in panel processing technology with the pure engineering and design that over 120,000 businesses across the world have come to trust.

For unique cabinet makers, it’s time saving features proved to be invaluable. “That powered rip fence itself saves us at least 35% (in terms of time),” Gus says. With fully motorised height, tilt, rip fence adjustments and the unparalleled cutting performance of an Altendorf saw, it offered the best of both worlds - productivity increase and higher precision.

According to Gus, the saw has also really helped with Unique Cabinet Makers when it came to reducing time spent for quoting and material ordering, “ARDIS software helps with quoting and not having to work out how many sheets to order every time really is a huge saving in itself…” Armed with an intuitive eye level display, the saw also possess a host of pc connectivity features onboard.

Unique Cabinet Makers are now based in Welland South Australia and continues to deliver high impact joinery work utilising all the different materials on offer today.

Portsch Classic Furniture


Emphasizing quality from the ground up


The humble beginnings of Portsch Classic Furniture is a familiar tale reminiscent of many Australian family owned businesses. Working from a small factory in Beverley South Australia, Michael was a one man team running everyday operations of the joinery shop…

That was more than two decades ago. Today, Michael and Rachel Portsch boast an efficient 800 sqm facility delivering premium kitchens and fit outs for some of Australia’s largest retailers.

With a solid reputation comes great demand and need for greater productivity while adhering to the company’s high level of workmanship. For Porsche Class Furniture the solution came in the form of an Altendorf Elmo IV panel saw. The Elmo IV represent’s the pinnacle of Altendorf’s hundred years of engineering and innovation, designed at its heart to be a superior cutting machine with increased productivity in mind.

“The new machine (Elmo IV) saves us up 30% in terms of time compared to our last panel saw,” Michael notes happily, and was even more pleased with the quality of the cuts, “Everything that comes off the machine is just accurate and square. That means a lot to us in achieving the work quality that we want to deliver to our customers in the end.”

12 months on, Michael and Rachel saw the need for a new edgebander to fuel their business growth and invested in the popular Holz-Her 1310-1-MTG edgebander. This is the company’s third Holz-Her in its 20 plus years of history and proven to be a highly successful component on Portsch Classic Furniture’s factory floor.

Distinguished by its reliability and high performance, the edgebander is equipped with fully automated movements of machining stations as well as Holz-Her’s popular glue cartridge system. “The machine is excellent,” commented Micheal, “the parts come off the machine and you can put them together without the need to touch them for finishing, it saves us at least 50% in terms of time compared to our previous edgebander.”

As a testament to how the philosophy of manufacturing excellence can come a long way, Portsch Classic Furniture has now become a name synonymous with high quality joinery beyond South Australia. With a team of 6 skilled professionals, the company’s representatives travel throughout Australia and New Zealand working with a broad range of customers on projects ranging from residential kitchens to commercial installations.

J & S Kitchen Installations


A Kitchen Powerhouse


Located in ‘the Shire’, home to famous beaches and iconic walkways sits a family owned business with a proud reputation. With an impressive portfolio of commercial and residential installations, J & S Kitchen Installations is the preferred choice of some of Australia’s leading banks and prestigious universities.

While some have resorted to the use of subcontractors during seasons of increased work load, this leads to varied standards of quality and added layers of complexity in communicating with customers. The Kirrawee based cabinet maker adopts a different approach by leveraging today’s advances in woodworking technology.

Established in 2001, like most Australian cabinet workshops, the father and son business began with an Altendorf panel saw and edgebander. Adhering to the strictest levels of quality standards and materials selection, J & S Kitchens began to see a limitation on their business growth on the production front with traditional technology and design software. In 2009 owners John and Shayne decided to explore new possibilities and installed the Cosmec 51L CNC center from Altendorf. Like many joiners however, new computer software represented unfamiliar territory and the search was on for a software solution that was both powerful and cost effective. Thanks to the modular concept from Altendorf Softlink’s Spazio3D, the entry level Cab Cam package became the ideal software choice, introducing the business to the world of Nested Based Manufacturing.

The complete Altendorf Softlink package of CNC machine and software is a powerful manufacturing solution. “We can do things we would never have been able to do before.” Says Shayne, pointing to an intricately patterned piece of wall panelling, “the machine has really helped with our productivity… This year’s been a really good one for us, we’ve nearly doubled our turnover.” The automating and streamlining of the production process involved from design to manufacturing proved to be an effective way to keep up with the demand for J & S’s quality kitchens. Well, that is the case at least on the production side of things… “we didn’t get a holiday break for the first time in 5 years because we’re so busy taking on more jobs.”

Increased production capacity has been achieved whilst maintaining the quality standards clients have come to expect from the veteran cabinetmaker.  After experiencing the benefits of Spazio 3D software, Shayne has taken the next step and invested in further Spazio 3D modules.  In particular he is keen to impress future clients with advanced design and presentation features and photo-realistic rendering.  Shayne is confident that these advanced capabilities can take J & S Kitchens through the next period of growth and their hard earned success will continue for years to come.

Perfect Kitchens


Unique design, top materials selection and only the best-in-class woodworking machinery...




Perfection is a term few would employ whether in advertising or when making a claim. But for Perfect Kitchens, the word represent’s the ambitious goal of the Sydney based joinery business. With a philosophy entailing ‘honest hard work’ and emphasis on client satisfaction, Perfect Kitchens has become a fixture in the community and has most definitely lived up to its name in the minds of its customers.

Since the onset of their business, Perfect Kitchens recognised the value of using only the highest quality materials, hardware and woodworking machinery. Founded more than two decades ago, Sam Sleiman started in a modest factory in Chipping Norton and laid the foundation for the quality standards the business is known for today with the Altendorf F90 Panel saw as his very first machine.

In keeping up with the joinery’s core values of outstanding craftsman ship, the Altendorf panel saw delivered highly precise and consistent cuts with unparalleled reliability year after year. Starting with the perfect cut to personalised service after completion, Sam’s kitchens quickly found themselves in the homes of satisfied Australian customers in growing numbers. “We treat every one of the kitchens we make as if it were our own”, Says Hassan, son and one of the four current co-owner of the successful joinery factory, “this is why we are so popular among our clients, most of our customers are recommended to us from other customers.”

Situated in the same location in a larger commercial estate, sons Ali, Hassan, Youssef and Ibrahim are the current joint owners of the business. “The fact that we have kept it within the family and do all the work ourselves mean our customers are guaranteed that they will only get the best from us, we’re the sole stakeholders here.” commented Ali.
In keeping up with the demand for their kitchens, the family business has acquired a flag ship Altendorf Elmo 4 panel saw with time saving automatic rip fence and cross cut fence features to expand their production capacity. “The new saw has really increased our productivity with everything being automatic” Explains Hassan, “and the quality of the cut shows

in the finishing. You can tell especially if you are a cabinet maker and it definitely adds to the overall feel in terms of quality for our customers.”

With a blend of unique design, top materials selection and best in class woodworking machinery, Perfect Kitchens continues to provide their customers with the highest quality kitchens and installations for decades to come.

A truly amazing saw


Within a year of founding his company, Wilhelm Altendorf achieved a dramatic breakthrough. He invented the first sliding table and cicular saw, based on the “altendorf system” – having no idea that, at a future date, it would become a top product with an international reputation.

Altendorf’s saw set a new standard in woodworking. For the differences from traditional machines were considerable. Up to that time, a conventional table saw had no mechanism for edging. That meant that, for the first and second longitudinal cut on untreated massive wood, the lumber always had to be fed manually through the saw blade.


The new Altendorf system of a sliding table and circular saw accomplished this task much more elegantly. With this system, the wood to be cut was fed through the saw blade while lying on a sliding table. By means of this innovative principle, cutting precision was vastly improved. (At a later date, the sliding table principle was replaced by the double roller carriage, also invented by Wilhelm Altendorf.) Wheras, previously, irregularities on the cutting surfaces had to be eliminated by additional truing up, now both the longitudinal cuts and the crosscuts came out of the machine absolutely even. This meant that by utilising a sliding table and circular saw the joiner or cabinetmaker could achieve a perfect, finished cut in one operation, in addition to eliminating the need for time-consuming finishing touches. It should be added that all sliding table saws built today are based on the prototype of the Altendorf system.

The decision in times of scant means to design and build his own machines from then on was typical of Wilhelm Altendorf. Whenever things got difficult, he began to fight and search for practicable solutions. He viewed financial difficulties as opportunities for venturing forth on new paths. And as a DIY enthusiast, he also took a great deal of pleasure in mastering challenges.

 

1906, a new company is born.


Within a short period of time, Wilhelm Altendorf had furthered his career in Berlin. In his first professional position, he had been promoted to head draftsman, and he was in charge of a five-member team of furniture designers. But this advance did not satisfy Wilhelm Altendorf for long. He wanted more. Little by little his plans took shape: Wilhelm Altendorf wanted to turn his ideas into reality in his own company.

The prospects for success were quite promising. In the course of his job as a salaried draftsman, Altendorf had already acquired sufficient know-how to risk the leap into self-employment. What was more, shortly after the turn of the century there were only three firms in all of Berlin that specialized in the construction of stores. On the other hand, more and more new companies and stores were moving into the capital, which led to a skyrocketing demand for good store-building concepts. After working for two years, and when all Berlin was laughing at the play “Der Hauptmann von Koepenick”, the time had come. In January 1906, Wilhelm Altendorf, together with his brother-in-law, Ernst Mueller, founded his own factory for store fittings near the Hackescher Markt at the address Grosse Hamburgerstrasse 20.

Altendorf’s wife, Emma Altendorf, assisted her husband to the best of her ability. During the day, she ran her own cigar store, as well as managing twenty rental apartments which were all located in the same building as the new store construction company. Evening after evening she did the bookkeeping for the young company on her Mignon typewriter – a task that she continued to do for many years. She was reluctant to entrust this important job even to a trained accountant, for she only really trusted her own arithmetic skills. At times, this resulted in double bookkeeping, whereby her version – if an error managed to slip in –was, of course, always the correct one.

It was only a year later that Altendorf ’s partner, Ernst Mueller, left the company – which left Wilhelm Altendorf facing a considerable challenge. His financial means were severely limited, allowing him scant leeway for urgently needed investments in machinery. But even if he had been in the financial position, Altendorf wanted nothing to do with the available technology, for the simple reason that the woodworking machines then available on the market failed to satisfy his requirements. In this ticklish situation, he summoned up his creative abilities and began himself to develop and construct machines for his own use. The particularly unusual thing about this was that most of these machines were made of wood and not of iron, which was the standard material.

The decision in times of scant means to design and build his own machines from then on was typical of Wilhelm Altendorf. Whenever things got difficult, he began to fight and search for practicable solutions. He viewed financial difficulties as opportunities for venturing forth on new paths. And as a DIY enthusiast, he also took a great deal of pleasure in mastering challenges.